CONTEMPORARY GEOMETRIC BEADWORK

an open source architectural beadwork project from Kate McKinnon and a worldwide team of innovators

Buckle up!

We’re off!

Teresa Sullivan is drugs, like Dali. She’s a trip. I remember the first time I met her, outside some building in Sonoma about 7 years ago, trying to decide if she was crazy or a genius. I know people have tried to figure out the same about me. Wisely I just went with it, and made her acquaintance. Jean Power can’t get enough of the wack/rad/awesome/bitchen groovy vibe and wants to take her everywhere she goes. Me, I want a ride in her ’68 Dodge Dart, and I want to bead a little pair of superhero wings for her action figure.

Above, a few pieces of the spiral weave that Teresa showed me yesterday. She brought the amazing Joyce Scott book Fearless Beadwork. The stitch is two bead peyote (husband and wife) with single additions (the slut bead). I am stunned, looking at this amazing comic book of beady wisdom.

Today, Funnels and Webs and Disks and Circles and Tubes and Spirals: how are they all connected? What stiches work best, what type of open space can they have? Will there be teeth, or rivolis buried at their core? Will they be sculptural, soft, or stiff? Fireline, Silamide, or Nymo? WHY?

I’ll report as fully as possible…

About katemckinnon

Kate McKinnon, globe-trotting writer and metalsmith, has devoted herself to the study of how things are done, and how they could be done better. She lives in Tucson, Arizona, and loves warm weather, nice people, rides in the car, and good books.

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This entry was posted on May 13, 2011 by .
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