CONTEMPORARY GEOMETRIC BEADWORK

an open source architectural beadwork project from Kate McKinnon and a worldwide team of innovators

Triangle Puff Barbie Waterbed Pillow

It has many aspects… click to enlarge.

After thinking the stitch and its implications over during the day yesterday, I suddenly integrated the logic into my cells, and I realized that I had been continuing to make an easy thing hard. (As Jean repeatedly told me.)  I like circular peyote a great deal, now that I grasp its versatility.

I can see a few places where I either hesitated, or where I went in to remove a row and correct an error. As with any kind of work with a flow, it’s best to get it right the first time. I will keep this in mind for the Future.

About katemckinnon

Kate McKinnon, globe-trotting writer and metalsmith, has devoted herself to the study of how things are done, and how they could be done better. She lives in Tucson, Arizona, and loves warm weather, nice people, rides in the car, and good books.

4 comments on “Triangle Puff Barbie Waterbed Pillow

  1. SallyA
    May 24, 2011

    Is this what I’m doing wrong w/ my triangles? That you’re supposed to do them all at once instead of as two separate entities joined by zippering — which I tried (unsucessfully). It never occurred to me to try it this way. Ok, I did 2 triangles yesterday and they sucked. Did 2 today a different way but think I was 1 row short all the way around the 2nd one so that twosome didn’t work either. Tomorrow I try circular peyote. Fortunately, I love peyote, love getting in the zone of peyote. Very meditative. Thank you for this!

    • katemckinnon
      May 24, 2011

      Well, I haven’t SEEN your triangles (not to mention that I have only done ONE correctly myself) so I can’t say for sure. Doing two and zipping them together should work fine, but Jean Freaking Power does them all at once, and I admit that this is much easier. Dustin should be drawing his instructions for the back any minute now, and of course Jean has the PDF of her instructions on her site for a very nominal charge. I just sort of figured it out- and mostly by looking at this picture of Jean’s work:

      You can see that there are plenty of options for the transition. Once you round the horn, though, you decrease very simply by just passing back through the top two beads, instead of adding two. Make sense?

      • SallyA
        May 25, 2011

        I just bought a couple of Jean’s patterns and will try those. That’s what I’ll try tonight. Can’t wait to see Dustin’s take on it, too. I didn’t send you photos of the last ones b/c they’re bad! Very bad. So next time… success. I’m predicting that! Thanks!

  2. Ellen Stoune
    May 24, 2011

    Air to the Mac! HA HA HA!

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